Effects Of Light Drinking During Pregnancy

For several decades, consuming alcohol for the duration of pregnancy was considered a no-no. Many neurological types of research on young children whose mamas were heavy drinkers helped derive a set of developmental and social impairments known as fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Mamas who are a borderline alcoholic or worse often give delivery to FAS children, who are impaired with learning ill health, decision making ill health, growth and friendliness impairments, and sometimes with a level of intelligence that falls into the retarded range.

Not a politically right term, but one that was used in a 1999 Wayne University (Detroit) meta-study reviews of numerous other studies on FAS and alcohol-related neurodevelopmental chaos (ARND). Alcohol-Related Neurological Disorder is the smaller of 2 evils, a shadow of FAS warning sign, but often marked by care or impulsive behavior, even Attention Deficit Chaos (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Chaos (ADHD). ARND was observationally discovered among kids whose mothers drank moderately, commonly one or two drinks every day for a few days each week. ARND was more pronounced on kids whose mamas were over 30 and drank moderately during perinatal period than women under thirty who drank moderately. Reading and arithmetic learning was slow among ARND kids, but usually with an intact level of intelligence. It was also discovered that having numerous drinks in one day occasionally, five or 6 at a party, for example, had a more adverse result on their newborns than the same quantity of drinks spaced out over a week.

Science Every day recently explained this study in detail and surmised it was more decisive than others in the past because they used DNA hereditary markers that are not influenced by differences in lifestyle, diet, social standing, atmosphere, or education.


Using genetic differences, known as Mendelian randomization, permits links to be made on future dispositions or even illnesses from earlier biological events.

The 4,000-plus females were surveyed at 18 weeks pregnant by filling out a survey to determine their alcohol consumption lifestyles before pregnancy and after. After 32 weeks or when the mamma first felt fetal movement, another survey was presented.

Their kids were a level of intelligence tested at age 8 using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Kids and compared to kids from mothers who had consumed no alcohol during the perinatal period.

It was discovered that the kids from mothers who spent moderately to even light amounts of alcohol had somewhat the significantly lower level of intelligence on average than the teetotaler moms’ kids.