Home Healthier Life Grow Your Own Herbs for Tea But How

Grow Your Own Herbs for Tea But How

by Tatiana Plesco
Herbs for Tea

Herbal tea is informal and rewarding to grow yourself. Many tea herbs are easy-to-grow and do well in pots and minor spaces, so you can like delightful home-grown tea year-round.

After our new move, my tea garden now limited in one square-foot box and lots and lots of pots. I have rapidly erudite how to make the most of our small space and have exposed that it is likely to grow enough herbs to use, dry, and store — no substance your garden size.

Although you can make tea out of nearly any herb, here are five (plus one more) of my favorites for both big and small gardens!

Lemon Verbena

Lemony-scented and refreshing, I beverage this tea all year long, either on its own or mixed with other basils. Given a tiny bit of garden room, Lemon Verbena will grow into a lovely bushy plant, with lots of leaves to dry and store for winter. Leaves can also be used new and make beautiful lemony iced tea. Grow in well-drained soil in full sun or a big pot. Grown as a year unless you live in the tropics or over-winter your container inside.

Lemon Verbena

Lemon Verbena leaves can also be used new and make beautiful lemony iced tea

German Chamomile

Chamomile is a lightly-flavored tea herb known for its soothing possessions. Often grown en masse in large parks, the secret to a generous harvest from a few plants is to harvest the plants as soon as you see them, and then keep reaping throughout the season. I collect a full Mason jar of dried flower heads in one season, all from a few plants in the corner of my plot.

Grow this yearly from seed in full sun. Although not optional for containers, I have positively done so, but favor to use a small bit of garden space for a healthier harvest.

Lemon Balm

Another lemony preferred! On top of a refreshing lemon flavor, it is also a calming herb often used to battle stress, anxiety, and insomnia. Leaves can be used fresh or dehydrated and are delightful for iced tea, too.

This perennial can take over the garden if you let it go to seed. Cutting it back often (while making delightful tea) will develop a luxuriant plant and stop seeds from starting. It produces well in a pot, but be sure to water often! It can be grown in full sun and complete shade. If you grow it in a pot, try storing it in a cool, dark spot during the winter months, and it will often come back in the spring.

Lemon Balm

Peppermint is a perennial favorite and aids in ingestion. Spearmint was a new one for me this year and the fast love of my visiting tea-drinking networks

Mint

It is a healthy tea herb. Peppermint is a perennial favorite and aids in ingestion. Spearmint was a new one for me this year and the fast love of my visiting tea-drinking networks. It can be used fresh all season and then dehydrated for winter use. Mints of all types are violent spreaders and are best grown limited unless you have a big space and are happy to have its stroll.

This perennial grows well in incomplete shade and in moist earth. It does very well in pots, but recalls to keep them watered! Similar to Lemon Balm, potted mints can hibernate in their containers in a cool dark place.

Anise Hyssop

Anise Hyssop makes a beautiful licorice-flavored tea. Both leaves and flowers can be reaped for tea and used fresh or dehydrated. This perennial loves full sun and well-drained soil. It does very well in a minor garden space or can be established in pots. Use a larger container to inspire larger plants and flowers.

Anise Hyssop

Anise Hyssop makes a beautiful licorice-flavored tea. Both leaves and flowers can be reaped for tea and used fresh or dehydrated

  • Raspberry Leaf (for more extensive gardens)

    I had to tack this on as an additional as it is not favorable to small gardens. However, it is a delightful tea herb, and if you have space, it is a rewarding plant to produce. Red Raspberry leaf tea has a taste very alike to old-style tea, but without the caffeine! It is lovely, both hot and iced.

    It is a recurrent that should be grown in full sun and well-drained soil. They do take a bit of care in clipping, but the crop is worth it. For tea, choose young leaves, thirsty them, and store until prepared to use.

  • Updated on 12/19/2019

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